About the Survey

The 2015 U.S. Trans Survey (USTS) is the follow up to the National Transgender Discrimination Survey, the largest survey ever devoted to the lives and experiences of trans people. The study was developed and conducted by the National LGBTQ Task Force and the National Center for Transgender Equality in 2008- 2009, and the results were released in the 2011 report: Injustice At Every TurnAs the single-most cited study about trans people—cited by media over 15,000 times—it has dramatically changed how the public and policymakers understand the challenges facing trans people.


Purpose of the 2015 U.S. Trans Survey  

Research: The National Transgender Discrimination Survey has been the community's go-to resource for helping the public understand trans people. It's shown us how many trans people have faced discrimination and harassment at school, work, in health care, in homeless shelters, in the criminal justice system, as well as many other areas of life. Going forward, the 2015 U.S. Trans Survey (USTS) will give researchers, policymakers, and advocates the ability to see the experiences of trans people over time, how things are changing, and what can be done to improve the lives of trans people.

The USTS will cover a wide range of topics that reflects the lives and experiences of trans people and is designed to more fully examine specific issue areas that disparately impact trans people, such as unemployment and underemployment, housing, health care, HIV/AIDS, disabilities, immigration, sex work, and police interactions. Many of the questions included in the USTS have never been asked of trans people before. Like last time, the data set will be shared with advocates, organizations, and academics for years to come.

Benchmark: The USTS will significantly improve measures in the survey to allow for comparing the lives of trans people to the U.S. population as a whole. This is crucial for demonstrating the disparities faced by trans people in the U.S. In addition, the USTS will be fielded every five years and will enable measuring of progress made over time.

Education & Advocacy: The 2015 USTS will continue to be an important resource for use in education and advocacy. As with the last study, the USTS will contribute to public education about trans people and provide information for advocating for policy and social advances for trans people.

 

Meet the 2015 U.S. Trans Survey Team

Sandy James, Survey Project Manager (He, Him)

As the Lead Author and the Survey Project Manager at NCTE, Sandy James has led the effort to collect the data, conduct survey outreach, and present the findings in the main report, as well as in future reports. He will also oversee the development of the dataset which will be available to other researchers in 2017. 

After a career as a forensic toxicologist, Sandy became a civil rights advocate with a focus on laws and policies that affect trans people. Sandy previously worked extensively with the National Trans Discrimination Survey as the Urvashi Vaid Research Fellow at the National LGBTQ Task Force. Sandy received a J.D. and an M.A. in American Government from Georgetown University and is pursuing his Ph.D. at Georgetown University.

 

Ma’ayan Anafi, Co-Author

Ma’ayan Anafi has poured through the data and was a major contributor to the writing of the entire report, helping to make it understandable for all audiences. Ma’ayan serves as a Policy Counsel at the National Center for Transgender Equality. As part of the NCTE team, Ma’ayan has worked to strengthen and preserve nondiscrimination protections for transgender communities, with a focus on efforts to defeat anti-transgender state legislation and the implementation of federal sex nondiscrimination laws in health care, employment, education, and housing. Ma’ayan obtained a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a B.A. from the University of Toronto. An Autistic and non-binary transgender person, Ma’ayan is the co-leader of the DC chapter of the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network. 

 
 

Ignacio Rivera, Survey Outreach Coordinator (They, Them) (March-September 2015)

As Survey Outreach Coordinator, Ignacio worked with the research team to develop and execute an outreach plan that ensures trans people throughout the country were represented in the 2015 US Trans Survey. Inspired by lived experiences with homelessness, poverty, and discrimination, Ignacio has been an advocate for over 20 years on economic justice, anti-racist and anti-imperialist work, and feminist and LGBTQ movements.

Ignacio is one of the founding board members for Queers for Economic Justice and is the Director of Training for the Global Trans Research and Advocacy Project (GTRAP).

 

 

Danielle Stevens, Survey Outreach Fellow (They, Them) (Spring 2015)

As the Survey Outreach Fellow, Danielle worked to conduct outreach to organizations, groups, and individuals throughout the country, building coalitions and support to ensure that the survey can be accessed by trans people across the country.

As a grassroots organizer and community healer, Danielle brought a unique perspective to their role as the USTS Outreach Fellow. As a gender-nonconforming femme person and lover engaged in work related to anti-oppression education, social justice activism, and community organizing (particularly within femme, queer, and trans people of color communities), Danielle’s life work is engaging in coalition and movement building amongst various communities, as our liberation depends on it.

 

 

Venus Selenite, Survey Outreach Fellow (She, Her) (Spring 2015)


As the Survey Outreach Intern, Venus coordinated various methods to connect individuals and organizations in promoting the survey and maintains the outreach database.  

A native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, she is a recent transplant to Washington, D.C. Venus is also a writer, performance artist, and advocate whose work explores limitless intersections and lived experiences of race, sexuality, and gender.

 

Rodrigo Aguayo-Romero, Survey Intern (He, Him) (Winter-Summer 2015)


As Survey Intern, Rodrigo worked with the survey project manager on the development and implementation of the 2015 U.S. Trans Survey.

Rodrigo is a doctoral student in the Clinical/Community Psychology program at The George Washington University. His research interests are focused on risk behaviors and disparities faced by ethno-racial gender and sexual minorities living with HIV/AIDS and those at risk. He is interested in examining distal and proximal minority stress factors impacting HIV among transgender individuals from a syndemics framework.

 

Jody Herman, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator (She, Her)

Jody L. Herman holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy and Public Administration from The George Washington University, where she also earned her M.A. in Public Policy. She has worked on issues of poverty, women’s rights, and anti-discrimination policy development with non-profit research, advocacy, and direct-service organizations in the U.S. and Mexico. Her research focuses on discrimination based on gender identity or expression.  Dr. Herman was a co-author of Injustice at Every Turn, based on the National Transgender Discrimination Survey.  She currently serves as the Williams Scholar of Public Policy at the Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law.

Mara Keisling, Co-Author (She, Her)

Mara Keisling is the founding Executive Director of the National Center for Transgender Equality, one of the nation’s leading social justice organization winning life-saving change for the transgender people. After a 25-year career in survey research, Mara helped found NCTE and quickly became one of the nation’s foremost authorities on transgender issues. Mara has led organizational and coalition efforts that have won significant advances in transgender equality throughout the country, especially in federal law and policy. Under her leadership, NCTE has won well over 100 federal policy changes that have improved the lives of transgender people. Mara was a co-author of Injustice at Every Turn: The Report of the National Transgender Discrimination Survey (2011). A native of Pennsylvania and a transgender woman, Mara holds a B.A. from Pennsylvania State University and conducted her graduate studies in American Government at Harvard University.

 

Willem Miller, USTS Intern (he/him) (Spring 2016)

As U.S. Trans Survey Intern, Willem primarily worked with the Survey Project Manager to conduct research, edit, and create content during the report-writing phase of the project.

Willem is a rising senior at Georgetown University where he is a Mathematics and Statistics major.  He is heavily involved in GU Pride, having served as VP of Community from 2015 to 2016 and currently as VP of Activism. On campus, Willem also works as a Residential Assistant.

Shabab Ahmed Mirza, Survey Project Assistant (he/him) (Winter 2016)

Shabab helped document the extensive survey outreach for publication in the U.S. Trans Survey report, assisted with research, and provided general project support.

As an organizer and researcher, Shabab is passionate about uplifting the stories of marginalized populations using art, data, and any other means necessary. Shabab was selected as a 2014 Young Leaders Institute fellow for South Asian Americans Leading Together, and serves on the Trans Justice Committee of the National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance. He is from Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Shabab headshot01_small.jpg

Lisa Mottet, Co-Author (She, Her)

Lisa Mottet joined the National Center for Transgender Equality as the Deputy Executive Director in 2013, where she helps guide policy advocacy, communications, and fundraising.  In her previous position as Director of the Transgender Civil Rights Project at the National LGBTQ Task Force (formerly the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force), she was a member of the research team for the National Transgender Discrimination Survey. She is also the author of Opening the Door to Transgender Inclusion: The Nine Keys to Making LGBT Organizations Fully Transgender-Inclusive and Transitioning Our Shelters: A Guide to Making Homeless Shelters Safe for Transgender People. Lisa received her J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center in 2001.

 

Susan Rankin, Ph.D., Co-Principal Investigator (She, Her)

Susan (Sue) Rankin retired from the Pennsylvania State University in 2013 where she most recently served as an Associate Professor of Education. Dr. Rankin has presented and published widely on the intersections of identities and the impact of sexism, genderism, racism and heterosexism in the academy and in intercollegiate athletics.  Dr. Rankin’s most recent publications include the 2010 State of Higher Education for LGBT People, The Lives of Transgender People, and the 2011 NCAA Student-Athlete Climate Study. Dr. Rankin has collaborated with over 120 institutions/organizations in implementing climate assessments and developing strategic initiatives regarding social justice issues. Dr. Rankin consulted on the original NTDS.

 
 

Jeymee Semiti, Survey Project Assistant (She/Her) 

With her Bachelors of Arts in Sociology, strong research skills and multicultural background, Jeymee brings unique perspective to the Survey project. Before coming on board as a research assistant for the launch of the 2015 U.S Trans Survey, Jeymee was a General Support Intern at NCTE, where she partook in efforts to combat anti-trans legislation including the contentious HB2 , worked with the team to draft inspirational blog posts, updated and analyzed policy memos on important releases such as the recent anti-discrimination provision of the Affordable Care Act, and organized databases with valuable resources for the trans community, coalitional partners and allies. As an aspiring advocate, she has conducted transgender cultural competency trainings with Trans Legal Advocates of Washington and is a successful litigant who advocated for her rights to work in a hostile environment.  For Jeymee being a part of this historic venture is a major stepping stone in finding her niche and pathway in LGBT and POC centered policymaking and advocacy.


USTS Advisory Committee (UAC)

The USTS Advisory Committee (UAC) worked with the survey team to ensure the success of the largest survey of trans people in the U.S. Members include advocates and individuals who have brought their expertise and lived experience to ensure that the survey is inclusive of a range of trans, genderqueer, and nonbinary identities  and that the results represent and reflect the reality of trans experiences in the U.S.

 

Danni Askini, Seattle, WA

Danni Askini, Seattle, WA

Cherno Biko, Columbus, OH

Cherno Biko, Columbus, OH

Thomas Coughlin, Washington, DC

Thomas Coughlin, Washington, DC

Brooke Cerda Guzman, New York, NY

Brooke Cerda Guzman, New York, NY

Trudie Jackson, Phoenix, AZ

Trudie Jackson, Phoenix, AZ

Andrea Jenkins, Minneapolis, MN

Andrea Jenkins, Minneapolis, MN

Angelica Ross, Chicago, IL

Angelica Ross, Chicago, IL

Nowmee Shehab, Atlanta, GA

Nowmee Shehab, Atlanta, GA

Stephanie Skora, Urbana, IL

Stephanie Skora, Urbana, IL

Brynne Tannehil, Xenia, OH

Brynne Tannehil, Xenia, OH

Lou Weaver, Houston, TX

Lou Weaver, Houston, TX

 

Other Team Members

Mara Keisling

Lisa Mottet          


Acknowledgements

The USTS team would like to acknowledge and thank the following individuals and organizations for their contributions to the USTS, without which the survey would not be possible.